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15 July 2010

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Great post John,

I tend to agree, in many cases it's easier to sell stories about Africa when you portray the black community as suffering or in need of help. As someone working here to produce happier stories, ones that don't depict said suffering, you are met with blank faces and questions as to why you are doing it.

I guess we often see Africa and black people as our daily escape clause. No matter how bad you feel your life is, seeing poor black people suffering brings home the reality you life isn't as bad as you imagined it.

@Daniel

Thanks very much for your comments. Even though I spend a lot of time in South Africa every year, I always worry about missing a nuance or two when I'm writing. Glad you liked the post.

I clicked on your name and discovered Verbal:

http://verbal.co.za/

Great stuff.

Haven't had time to look at everything, but I really like your Orania project. I'll be stopping by often.

as someone who has little direct experience of these issues, and therefore little of relevance to contribute to the debate, I just want to say great stuff John. i've found all your recent posts on race and photography very thought provoking. This one is no exception. please keep it up

@Ciara

It's good to hear that I'm making sense. Thanks!

BTW, I've seen your photography, and it's pretty clear to me that you've got a lot to contribute to these debates.

thanks John. It's the race issue that I feel I have nothing to add to the debate on. I care deeply and follow other people's discussions but it's something I don't feel qualified to comment on really. It's a minefield which I'm happy to observe from the sidelines.

Does poverty have a colour? I would have to say poverty is poverty. It doesn't come in any colour shape or size. The debate should be on what we as a nation can do about those who are struggling. Many of us have turned our focus on the colour of poverty rather than the fact that while we sit and have our debates innocent people are losing their lives to poverty and when a person dies because of poverty it doesn't matter what colour they are all that matter is that someone died because having a warm meal was never an option for them.

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