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24 May 2012

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I think what you say is true, though perhaps nostalgic. Besides, the sweetness of the sentiment is comically flawed by the very fact that you had to rely on a digitised garage sale to engage with 'finding' your analogue trophy. Another example of how photography has been fantastically enhanced by the modern (er, digital) age. Life magazine itself has embraced the digital distribution format. I regularly link through their tweets, and have the pleasure of leafing through their archives without the authenticity of the feel of a magazine. You could even argue that photography has to be better than ever before in history to be able to shine through the haze and myriad of the mediocre.
I don't mean to sound harsh, and please don't take it that way, but the digital is better than analogue is better than digital epiphany has been grinding away at us for perhaps as long as your magazine is old.
Suggest: shoot film or shoot digital then present pictures. No need to proclaim one or the other as 'better' or indeed worse.

A few years ago Alf Khumalo the veteran South African photographer and journalist talked about getting his start in the profession as a freelancer for what were essentially weekly advertisers and monthly catalogs with a bit of community news thrown in, and how that experience was instrumental in developing his style as a self taught photographer. He quickly learned to produce photographs that had enough immediate power to compete with the ads and draw readers to his articles, and that skill eventually led to full time work as a magazine and newspaper photographer.

Hello, Alexander.

I always tell my students that when a reader misses the point it's the writer's fault, not the reader's. I wish that I had expressed myself my more clearly.

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